pedestrian accident

Pedestrian accidents occur the most in large populated urban states. The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) announced in a News Release, February of 2015 U.S. states, including California, Texas, Florida, and New York accounted for 43 percent of all pedestrians’ fatalities in 2013, according to Dr. Allan Williams, former Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Chief Scientist. The states with the highest rates of fatalities per 100,000 residents were Delaware and Florida. Dr. Williams also presented data that showed District of Columbia had the highest percentage of fatalities caused by motor vehicles. The mission of GHSA is to reduce those percentages in all states to zero.

Statistics reveal from 1975 to 2013 and 2014, the number of pedestrian fatalities reduced by 2,781 accidents. The total fatalities in 1975 was 7,516 and 4,735 in 2013. Additional improvements are also revealed with a tremendous rate reduction of children involved pedestrian accidents, which was 21 percent in 1975 and four percent in 2013. This proves GHSA and U.S. states are educating pedestrians and drivers, as well as implementing engineering and enforcement solutions for protection. Let’s discuss where in a city a pedestrian is likely to be hit; who is at fault, the vehicle or pedestrian; accident preventive measures; and when the fault is the pedestrian or driver.


Where in a City Does Pedestrian Get Hit the Most?

Non-intersections are rated the highest in a city where pedestrians are hit the most in an urban environment. Data from the United States Department of Transportation showed more than 70 percent of fatalities among pedestrians while running, walking, on foot, or jogging were involved in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2012. Most of those accidents happened during the nighttime between the hours of 6:00 PM and 5:59 AM; and when the weather condition was clear. Amazingly, pedestrian accidents happened only 11 percent during rainy, snowy, and foggy weather conditions, compared to 89 percent during normal weather conditions.


Is It Usually the Fault of the Pedestrian or the Vehicle?

Cases involving vehicle and pedestrian accidents, the pedestrian is usually at fault, based on a 2002 study conducted in selected cities by researchers from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Data from cities, Baltimore and Washington, District of Columbia showed 50 percent of pedestrians were at fault and 39 percent of drivers were at fault for accidents. Approximately 11 percent of pedestrian accidents were determined as

Cases involving vehicle and pedestrian accidents, the pedestrian is usually at fault, based on a 2002 study conducted in selected cities by researchers from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Data from cities, Baltimore and Washington, District of Columbia showed 50 percent of pedestrians were at fault and 39 percent of drivers were at fault for accidents. Approximately 11 percent of pedestrian accidents were determined as shared or unknown fault.

Pedestrians were responsible for crashes by running into roads or intersections. A study of collisions reported by police officers found pedestrians at fault in North Carolina. In cities, such as Hawaii, there were a high rate of drivers at fault. Accidents involving automobiles running off the road and hitting individuals are the drivers fault.


How Can People Help Prevent These Accidents?

traffic safety cones

Pedestrian injury and fatality accidents are preventable if people are alert and follow simple safety tips while driving or crossing the intersection. If drivers remain alert while operating motor vehicles, some accidents are avoidable even if the pedestrian is at fault. The same alertness is applicable to pedestrians if drivers are at fault. Pedestrians and drivers share equal responsibilities for as being alert and sober.

When jogging, walking or running, people should remain on the sidewalk beside the street or shoulder of the road. Always walk facing on-going traffic and avoid the use of smartphones and other electronic devices. To be alert, the pedestrian must be observant of his or her surroundings and the ability to hear clearly. Where there are no crosswalks or intersections to cross the street, wait until traffic clears and constantly watch to ensure no vehicle is moving.

Pedestrians can also prevent accidents by carrying a flashlight and wearing reflective clothing during nighttime. Drivers and pedestrians must avoid prescribed medications and controlled substances, such as alcohol which causes impairment.


When Is a Pedestrian Accident the Fault of the Pedestrian, and When Is It the Fault of the Driver?

If a pedestrian crosses an intersection while the crosswalk sign shows ″don’t walk″ and is hit by a moving automobile, for an example, the pedestrian is the fault of the accident. Other instances a pedestrian may be at fault are crossing prohibited roadways, freeways, and highways.

A driver who refused to stop and render aid after hitting a pedestrian, whether it is the fault of the pedestrian or not, maybe charged with hit and run in the court of law. Drivers are likely at fault for backing up, turning, or swaying off the road and hitting pedestrians.

Analysis of data and studies have shown that drivers and pedestrians are at fault of fatal and injury accidents in the United States. Statistics show a decline in pedestrian accidents, but the numbers can be lowered if drivers and pedestrians take safety precautions. Various states are helping to prevent accidents by taking engineering measures, increasing pedestrian signal, education, and law enforcement. Education and reducing speed limits are probably the main reasons there is a reduction in pedestrian fatalities and injuries over the years.