If you’re a motorcycle enthusiast, you need to know how motorcycle insurance is different from car insurance in the State of Nevada. When you take to the open road, it’s important to understand the difference in required coverage.

The State of Nevada classifies motorcycles as any vehicle with two or three wheels with a seat for the driver. All motorcycle owners need insurance and may need to work with a Las Vegas personal injury attorney after a crash. Here’s what you need to know about differences between motorcycle and car insurance in the State of Nevada.

Motorcycle Insurance Form

You Must Have Motorcycle Insurance to Operate Your Vehicle

Even if you have car insurance for another vehicle, you must still have insurance just for your motorcycle. Your car insurance alone isn’t enough to cover you if you’re in an accident on your motorcycle. It’s important to remember to get the insurance that you need for your motorcycle separate and in addition to your car insurance.

If you purchase car insurance for your car, you may be able to get a rider that also covers motorcycle use. Most insurance companies are happy to sell two policies instead of one. It’s important to read the terms of your contract carefully, however. Some insurance motorcycle riders may not offer the same coverage that you have for your primary vehicle. It’s important to make sure that your motorcycle insurance provides the coverage that you’re looking for.

What Motorcycle Insurance Do I Need?

To make sure that you get the motorcycle insurance that you’re looking for, you need to know what insurance you need. Nevada requires all drivers on the road to purchase a minimum amount of coverage. The rule applies equally to motorcycle drivers as well as to car and truck drivers.

As of July 1, 2018, you must have $25,000 in coverage for bodily injuries for any person that you injured in an accident. You must have $50,000 total coverage for bodily injuries in case there’s more than one person hurt in the crash. You must also carry $20,000 in property damage coverage. The shorthand that you might see for this minimum coverage is 25/50/20.

Keep in mind that these amounts of coverage are just the minimum. If someone suffers physical injuries in a car accident, $25,000 may not go very far to cover their medical bills. You can purchase more than the minimum motorcycle insurance. It’s important to consider your needs as you determine how much insurance to buy.

In addition to only covering minimum amounts, required motorcycle insurance is also just liability insurance. You should also consider additional types of insurance that can cover you in case a driver that hits you is uninsured or underinsured. Comprehensive coverage can also protect you in case your car suffers damage in another way like a fallen tree or weather.

You Must Have Motorcycle Insurance to Register and Operate Your Vehicle in Nevada Lawfully

In the State of Nevada, all motorcycle owners must have insurance before they can lawfully operate their vehicle. If you do not have insurance, you risk fines that can range from $250 to $1,000 as well as reinstatement fees. The amount of the fine depends on how long it’s been since you had valid insurance and whether you have any prior offenses. For repeat offenders, you also risk suspension of your driving privileges.

Nevada’s Insurance Verification Program

Nevada has a system in place to help law enforcement verify insurance policies for drivers. The insurance verification program calls for insurance companies to share information about their clients. If you have an insurance policy, the insurance company tells the State of Nevada. The state keeps the information at their disposal to verify your insurance.

If the state has reason to believe that your insurance has lapsed, they may send you a request for verification. Usually, you have 20 days from the date of the notice to verify your coverage. You can provide the information by mail or online. The State of Nevada cancels your registration if they don’t receive your verification.

Can I Self-Insure My Motorcycle?

You can self-insure your motorcycle if you own more than ten vehicles in total.

Remember to Wear a Helmet

Nevada law requires all motorcycle riders to wear helmets. Failing to wear a helmet is not only against the law, but it opens you up to legal liability if you’re hurt in a crash. The other driver might argue that your injuries may have been less severe if you wore a helmet. If the jury agrees, you may not receive compensation that covers all of your injuries.

After Motorcycle Accident

What Happens If I’m in an Accident with My Motorcycle?

Nevada is an at-fault state for vehicle accidents. The same rules apply to motorcycles that apply to all vehicles. If you’re in a crash, the person who causes the accident is liable to pay you for your injuries. If their insurance doesn’t cover your injuries, you can look to your own insurance policy if you have the right kind of coverage to cover the losses that you have. Generally, however, the at-fault driver should cover your injuries.

Related: How Do Car Accidents Compare to Motorcycle Accidents?

How We Help Motorcycle Drivers

Our team injury attorneys can help you with motorcycle insurance issues if you’re in a crash. We can help you determine what your options are and what you can do to receive a fair recovery for your losses. You may be surprised to learn just how much you can recover if you’re the victim of a motorcycle accident in Nevada.

In some cases, receiving a fair recovery is as simple as determining the value of your claim and submitting a request to the right insurance company. If that’s the case, it’s still important to meet with our team of legal professionals, because we can ensure that you include all of the categories of possible damages in your claim. We can help you value damages like pain and suffering and emotional anguish to include in the total amount of your claim.

In other cases, you need to prove who’s at fault for the accident and bring a formal claim. No matter your legal needs, we have the experience and resources to help you advocate for your best interests in the Nevada legal system.